Found in the University Archives!

2 notes

24 Plays
Interviewed by Barry Teicher and Andrew C. Locke
Interview with Francis Hole

Francis D. Hole, Emeritus professor of geography and soil science, was one of UW-Madison’s most popular teachers, and a much sought-after guest lecturer.  

Joining the UW (Madison) staff in 1946, for decades Hole was influential in not only his research into what lies beneath our feet, but in nurturing an appreciation in students and the general public of what he called their “Earth birthright,” an awareness of the soil and enjoyment of it.

Often traveling with a violin, soil auger, and suitcase of puppets in hand while performing songs, poems and plays that romanticized the soil, he brought soil study to the forefront in scientific research.

In 1983 he led a successful campaign to name Antigo slit loam Wisconsin’s state soil. In this audio clip, Professor Hole discusses the difficulties he and others like him had in getting soil science recognized as a legitimate field of scientific study.

Hole died in 2002 at the age of 88, but his legacy and enthusiasm for the riches of nature lives on.

To learn more about this interview with Francis Hole, visit the UW-Madison Oral History Program’s website.

Listen to Hole’s interview online at Minds@UW.

Allison Neely for UW-Madison Archives

*****

For more information about campus history, contactuwarchiv@library.wisc.edu or visit http://archives.library.wisc.edu. On, Wisconsin!

Filed under UW-Madison soil science earth science madison wihistory campus history geography faculty Francis Hole University of Wisconsin Madison CALS College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

108 notes

todaysdocument:

How would you celebrate the 80th Anniversary of the National Archives?  Build a Lego National Archives?
We stumbled* across this miniature National Archives Building during a recent visit to Legoland. It’s impressively detailed, down to the eagles along the cornice and the statues of Heritage and Guardianship on the Constitution Avenue side.  (Don’t miss the real statues up close, circa 1940). (*We didn’t stumble on them literally of course - everyone knows how much they hurt!)
We have to wonder, what other models of the National Archives building are out there?

Awesome!

todaysdocument:

How would you celebrate the 80th Anniversary of the National Archives?  Build a Lego National Archives?

We stumbled* across this miniature National Archives Building during a recent visit to Legoland. It’s impressively detailed, down to the eagles along the cornice and the statues of Heritage and Guardianship on the Constitution Avenue side.  (Don’t miss the real statues up close, circa 1940).
(*We didn’t stumble on them literally of course - everyone knows how much they hurt!)

We have to wonder, what other models of the National Archives building are out there?

Awesome!

14 notes

Mobile AND moving (sniff, sniff). This UW Extension exhibit presented beef research at UW to county fair and Wisconsin State Fair attendees in the early 1960s. Hey UW Extension, there’s no crying in beef research! 
Image #S13337. 
For more information about this photo, contact uwarchiv@library.wisc.edu. On, Wisconsin!

Mobile AND moving (sniff, sniff). This UW Extension exhibit presented beef research at UW to county fair and Wisconsin State Fair attendees in the early 1960s. Hey UW Extension, there’s no crying in beef research! 

Image #S13337

For more information about this photo, contact uwarchiv@library.wisc.edu. On, Wisconsin!

Filed under state fair beef exhibits CALS agriculture UW Extension UW-Madison

8 notes

digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

"Minnesota at Play" by Jason Roy. All images from partners of the Minnesota Digital Library.
Portrait of Fredrick B. Johnson, Duluth, Minnesota, 1880. Whitesides, William. University of Minnesota Duluth, Kathryn A. Martin Library, Northeast Minnesota Historical Center Collections. http://dp.la/item/82c99be168bc3da08c0c9df4c24e4fb6?
Sailing on Lake Minnewaska, Glenwood, Minnesota, ca. 1910-1920. Pope County Historical Society.http://dp.la/item/ecf7c53f580c9f2fe59e2f251559cb82
Canoe trip in the Superior National Forest, St. Louis County, Minnesota, 1925. North Star Museum of Boy Scouting and Girl Scouting.http://dp.la/item/46194e06ade8829cb044706f4e2f0291
St. Cloud Technical High School football game, St. Cloud, Minnesota, ca. 1945-1955. Hall, Myron, 1911-1996. Stearns History Museum.http://dp.la/item/94b486c6697583b045d0d120c061f931
Students playing baseball, Minnesota School for the Deaf, Faribault, Minnesota, ca. 1915-1920. Minnesota State Academy for the Deaf Alumni Association Museum.http://dp.la/item/75eca3a9b0e4dfab6b26b7e65e6b5b30
Students cross country skiing at The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, Minnesota, ca. 1950-1959. The College of St. Scholastica.http://dp.la/item/c735cb513ed938bfececdec446ddcdca
Figure skaters posing at Winter Haven, Sartell, Minnesota, ca. 1951. Hall, Myron, 1911-1996. Stearns History Museum.http://dp.la/item/82753348f8bb1b06f2dce32c449778a1
John Harrang and family fishing, northern Minnesota. Bjornaas, Haakon, 1884-1949. Northwest Minnesota Historical Center.http://dp.la/item/9f58bc576f506c8ae04405ee3d5f886e
Two boys on Scrambler, Excelsior Amusement Park, Excelsior, Minnesota, ca. 1950-1959. Excelsior-Lake Minnetonka Historical Society.http://dp.la/item/128b50a6fa17ac0d12a3857a170011c4

Love this collection!

digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

"Minnesota at Play" by Jason Roy.
All images from partners of the Minnesota Digital Library.

Portrait of Fredrick B. Johnson, Duluth, Minnesota, 1880. Whitesides, William. University of Minnesota Duluth, Kathryn A. Martin Library, Northeast Minnesota Historical Center Collections. 
http://dp.la/item/82c99be168bc3da08c0c9df4c24e4fb6?

Sailing on Lake Minnewaska, Glenwood, Minnesota, ca. 1910-1920. Pope County Historical Society.
http://dp.la/item/ecf7c53f580c9f2fe59e2f251559cb82

Canoe trip in the Superior National Forest, St. Louis County, Minnesota, 1925. North Star Museum of Boy Scouting and Girl Scouting.
http://dp.la/item/46194e06ade8829cb044706f4e2f0291

St. Cloud Technical High School football game, St. Cloud, Minnesota, ca. 1945-1955. Hall, Myron, 1911-1996. Stearns History Museum.
http://dp.la/item/94b486c6697583b045d0d120c061f931

Students playing baseball, Minnesota School for the Deaf, Faribault, Minnesota, ca. 1915-1920. Minnesota State Academy for the Deaf Alumni Association Museum.
http://dp.la/item/75eca3a9b0e4dfab6b26b7e65e6b5b30

Students cross country skiing at The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, Minnesota, ca. 1950-1959. The College of St. Scholastica.
http://dp.la/item/c735cb513ed938bfececdec446ddcdca

Figure skaters posing at Winter Haven, Sartell, Minnesota, ca. 1951. Hall, Myron, 1911-1996. Stearns History Museum.
http://dp.la/item/82753348f8bb1b06f2dce32c449778a1

John Harrang and family fishing, northern Minnesota. Bjornaas, Haakon, 1884-1949. Northwest Minnesota Historical Center.
http://dp.la/item/9f58bc576f506c8ae04405ee3d5f886e

Two boys on Scrambler, Excelsior Amusement Park, Excelsior, Minnesota, ca. 1950-1959. Excelsior-Lake Minnetonka Historical Society.
http://dp.la/item/128b50a6fa17ac0d12a3857a170011c4

Love this collection!

1 note

25 Plays
UW Boxing

When the badgers lost the final four, I was shocked and I felt like a potential championship at UW was taken away by a last second shot. Could you imagine if one moment in a game ended an entire sport? A team with a unique and tragic history is the University of Wisconsin Boxing Team. They were disbanded in 1960 along with the NCAA Boxing program. Former Coach of UW Boxing John J. Walsh gave a fascinating interview discussing his involvement with these young men and how boxing tied him to the UW.

Having boxed at the UW in 1938, he was at another school when UW offered him the coaching job. He initially turned it down to attend law school. The next day he discovered that law school would close, so he called UW back. They offered the job to him again, and he accepted.

To find out more about UW-Madison Boxing Team, go to our mini-movie, entitled “The Legacy of Charlie Mohr and UW-Madison Boxing.” You can visit his page on the UW-Madison Oral History Program’s website. Or, go to his interview at Minds@UW.

Matthew Jackson for UW-Madison Archives

*****

For more information about campus history, contact uwarchiv@library.wisc.eduor visit http://archives.library.wisc.edu. On, Wisconsin!

Filed under UWHistory wihistory history boxing campus history

4 notes

wilife:

Watch Wisconsin Life Episode 105

Meet an eclectic collection of people who share what matters most to them in their Wisconsin lives including: an urban farmer, a yoga instructor who adds a new twist to the traditional practice, a pair of Midwest surfers, a Native teacher in Green Bay schools and an unlikely set of hunting partners.

0 notes

25 Plays
Chancellor's Scholarship
Interview with Mercile Lee

"Instead of sleeping in on an early September morning, I walked, what felt like twenty miles, to my first Chancellors-Powers-Knapp Scholarship event. This program awards merit-based, campus-wide scholarships to academically outstanding and talented high school students from around the nation. Specifically, they recognize students who held leadership positions and were active in their communities.

Knowing no one at this event, I did what all Wisconsin freshmen do, I wandered around. While doing that I crossed paths with my scholarship’s founder, Mercile Lee. I remember being so surprised at her energy and her presence; people, myself included, seemed drawn immediately to her.”

The clip in this post comes from an interview between Lee and Barry Teicher conducted in 2000. Lee discusses how a car ride to a Connecticut summer camp with an instructor and another student began her path towards graduate school and, eventually, to her career in higher education.

To learn more about this interview with Lee, go to her page on the UW-Madison Oral History Program’s website.

Or, go to her interview at Minds@UW.

Photo of Mercile Lee by Bryce Richter, University Communication.

Matthew Jackson for UW-Madison Archives

*****

For more information about campus history, contact uwarchiv@library.wisc.edu or visit http://archives.library.wisc.edu. On, Wisconsin!

Filed under campus history history WIHistory

0 notes

11 Plays
Interviewed by Troy Reeves
Interview with Bill Cronon

The only graduation ceremony I attended in my life was high school, primarily because my school’s valedictorian fell a bit short with his speech—he compared our graduating class to “The Brady Bunch”. After this disappointment, I didn’t see much point in ceremonies and chose to not attend my undergraduate graduation.

With my forthcoming graduation from the UW-Madison School of Library and Information Studies, however, I will soon be confronted with the option to attend and eat cake or stay home and disappoint my friends and family yet again. After hearing about UW-Madison professor Bill Cronon’s honors convocation address, he has renewed my faith in graduation ceremonies.

In honor of both this year’s graduation and Earth Day, we share an excerpt from Cronon’s oral history interview. During his senior year at UW-Madison, he spoke at commencement. As you will hear, he chose this opportunity to push the boundaries of a senior’s speech by asking his fellow graduates and those in attendance to think about their physical environment—specifically preserving it—as they moved forward in their lives and careers.

More information about the oral history interview with William Cronon can be found here: http://tinyurl.com/myf58va

Photo of UW (Madison) Commencement, 1970.

Michelle Dubert-Bellrichard for UW-Madison Archives

*****
For more information about this tradition or campus history, contact uwarchiv@library.wisc.edu or visit 
http://archives.library.wisc.edu. On, Wisconsin!

Filed under UW-Madison William Cronon Earth Day Commencement campus history WIHistory madison history

3 notes

Red Meat and Running

Today’s college athletes have a wealth of nutritional advice and support at their disposal to help them perform at the top of their game. The 1920s were no different, as shown by this ‘Training Diet’ found in the collection of Ralph Spetz, captain of the UW Track Team in 1923.

Well, maybe a little different… 

image

"Broiled steak, beef, roast beef, mutton or lamb…" Lean protein? What lean protein? Although, the assertion that all breakfast foods are good was probably truer in an age before marshmallows had a place in cereal. 

Spetz, who graduated from the UW in 1922, studied engineering and made his mark as a sprinter on the track team. He was drafted during the last weeks of the First World War and served as a private in the Military Police Company on campus.

image

Apparently, his training regimen was enough to keep up with whatever dietary advice he took, as Spetz captained the team in his senior year, becoming the third engineer in a row to do so. 

So how did that diet work out in competition? See for yourself: 

image

That’s Spetz, third from the right, leading the pack. Note the anguished look of the runner second from the left, surely wishing he’d eaten to win. Choosing the day old bread over that tempting fresh loaf can be the difference between triumph and humiliation.

By Elzbieta Beck for UW-Madison Archives

For more information about this story or UW-Madison campus history, visit http://archives.library.wisc.edu. On, Wisconsin!

Filed under history UW-Madison track and field Spetz university athletics wihistory campus history meat

0 notes

9 Plays
Recruiting Scholars Clip
Chancellor’s Scholarship, Part 2: Recruiting Scholars

About two weeks after being admitted to the University of Wisconsin, I received a letter about a merit-based program, called the Chancellor’s Scholarship. Receiving an opportunity to apply to this program made me feel as if Wisconsin was actively trying to recruit me. I ended up receiving a scholarship to the Powers-Knapp program, but I always wondered why the program selected me to apply.

The following clip help explains the methods for recruiting students to these merit-based scholarships. As you will hear, it is much more than just the scholarship staff that recruits students. Staff and the faculty of the university have supported the program. Some faculty invest their own money into the program because they believe in this important initiative. Another huge help for recruiting and maintaining the program is the school’s alumni; they give both their time and funds to make sure that programs like these keep on growing.

Learn more about Lee on the UW-Madison Oral History Program’s website: http://archives.library.wisc.edu/oral-history/guide/501-600/551-560.html#lee Listen to the interview at Minds@UW:http://minds.wisconsin.edu/handle/1793/68202.

Matthew Jackson for UW-Madison Archives

*****

For more information about campus history, contact uwarchiv@library.wisc.edu or visit http://archives.library.wisc.edu. On, Wisconsin!

Filed under UWHistory UW-Madison Chancellors scholarships

105 notes

congressarchives:

Think your driver’s license photo makes you look silly? At least you aren’t Department of Commerce official J. Mishell George. No, this isn’t a April Fool’s prank. Newspaper reader Judge L.S. Oliver really thought George looked downright nefarious.
Letter from Judge L.S. Oliver to the Permanent Subcommitte on Investigations, 3/13/1956, Records of the United States Senate

congressarchives:

Think your driver’s license photo makes you look silly? At least you aren’t Department of Commerce official J. Mishell George. No, this isn’t a April Fool’s prank. Newspaper reader Judge L.S. Oliver really thought George looked downright nefarious.

Letter from Judge L.S. Oliver to the Permanent Subcommitte on Investigations, 3/13/1956, Records of the United States Senate

(via todaysdocument)